Citizenship, National Identity, and the Search for Stability in Canada

Raymond Blake

Abstract


When Canada was created it debated if it was best to seek political solidarity by creating a single political identity or was it wiser to build a citizenship that made space for all communities. This article argues there was no attempt to unite Canadians around a single national loyalty but only to join an array of diverse communities whose members might adopt a shared citizenship. Since 1867, Canada has adopted different approaches to creating citizenship to maintain political solidarity. Diversity has been an integral part of that narrative.


Keywords: Canada; diversity; citizenship; nation-building; George-Étienne Cartier; Justin Trudeau


DOI: 10.14712/23363231.2020.2

© 2019 The Authors. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.


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ISSN 1213-4449 (Print)
ISSN 2336-3231 (Online)
 
AUC Studia Territorialia is an open-access journal. The journal and the contributions therein are distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.